Getting Around Cambodia


Getting Around Cambodia

Getting Around by Air
Internal flights operate between Phnom Penh and Siem Reap for Angkor (journey time - 45 minutes). The main domestic carriers are Cambodia Angkor Airways International (website:www.cambodiaangkorair.com)  and PMT Air (website: www.pmtair.com). PMT Air has suspended internal flights in 2008 while they upgrade their fleet, but continue to fly internationally. Battambang, Sihanoukville, Banlung, Sen Monorom and Stung Treng all have airports, but at the time of writing there are only flights to Banlung from Phnom Penh. 

Getting Around by Water
Government-run ferries depart from the Psar Chas Ministry of Transport Ferry Landing between 102 and 104 Streets and go to Siem Reap, a route popular with travellers. Tickets can be bought in person at the dock or through a travel agent. Travel can be difficult in the dry season when the water level is very low and often boat services are suspended.

Getting Around by Rail
Cambodia has only one functioning train service, running once a week from Phnom Penh Railway Station to Battambang on Saturdays and vice-versa on Sundays. Although the carriage is basic and the trip takes longer than going by bus, it's an excellent way of viewing rural Cambodia. 

Getting Around by Road
Traffic drives on the right. Roads vary from excellent to very poor and there are numbered routes from Phnom Penh with Route 1 leading to the Vietnamese border. Care should be taken while driving as accidents are relatively frequent. Other vehicles cannot always be relied on to use headlights at night. Given the predominant use of motorcycles for urban public transportation, travellers should ensure that any insurance policies provide coverage for riding as a driver or passenger. Cattle often stray onto the roads. In Siem Reap, the local police have banned rental outlets from hiring motorcycles to tourists because of the high number of accidents.

Getting Around by Tuk Tuk

The tuk tuk has got to be one of the most pleasant forms of intraurban transit in Cambodia. The official name for them is the French word remorque, but everyone still calls them tuk tuks. These two-wheeled carriages pulled behind a moto are a breezy way to travel and are marginally safer than going by moto–mostly because they go at about half the speed.


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